Inbound Marketing for Industrial Manufacturers

Inbound Marketing for Industrial Manufacturers

Industrial manufacturers are vastly underserved when it comes to marketing resources. But just like all other businesses, you have something to sell, and in order to sell it, you need interested buyers to know about your business and your offerings. Marketing is the way to raise this awareness, especially with the increasing primacy of the internet in researching and making purchases over good ol’ word-of-mouth. Here’s what you need to know about inbound marketing as an industrial manufacturer.

Were You Even Marketing in the First Place?

For a lot of industrial manufacturers, the answer to this question is no. For another big segment, it’s “we go to trade shows”—so, not really. It doesn’t seem like marketing is really necessary or relevant when you’re an industrial manufacturer, after all, you’re not marketing to consumers, but to other businesses, most of whom need your product to make their product or perform their service. Additionally, industrial products aren’t exactly high appeal; they’re useful and utilitarian, but they aren’t going to bring the boys to the yard.

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But, you still have a product to sell, and you still want to reach new customers. Your industrial manufacturing marketing strategy needs to be different than B2Cs, but it shouldn’t be no strategy at all. Click To Tweet

Inbound Marketing for Industrial Manufacturers

So, you know you shouldn’t be running TV ads with celebrities endorsing your spring for garage door openers or hubcap bolt covers, but what should you be doing to attract potential buyers? Inbound marketing. Inbound marketing is kind of what it sounds like: rather than going out to your customers with interruptive ads or cold sales calls, you bring interested customers to you. (Learn more about the methodology in our complete guide to inbound marketing.) You do that by creating targeted digital content and ads that will appeal to your ideal customer and the person in the role responsible for sourcing and purchasing your products.

SEO and Digital Content

If you don’t already know this, you need a website and a digital presence. It’s 2018 (almost 2019!). But you don’t just need a website—if yours looks the same as it did in 1998 or even 2008, that’s not good—you need compelling digital content that will appeal to potential customers and make your site easy for search engines to find and categorize. This is SEO, Search Engine Optimization (find out more about SEO for manufacturers here). The content on your site should provide customers with all the information they need about your product, whether they’re just discovering that your product exists or they’re trying to decide on a new supplier, as well as the keywords for which you want your website to show up in the search engine results.

PPC and Paid search  

PPC, pay-per-click advertisement, and paid search are also crucial components of inbound marketing for industrial manufacturers.If you have a good site and strong content, you need to make sure your desired clients are seeing it. Advertising is how you do that. Click To Tweet Paid search allows you to be featured as a search result at the top of the page in a native ad for search words that you select that your ideal clients will be searching. This puts you in front of your audience when they’re looking for what you sell.

You can also use PPC ads to target your ideal buyers. For industrial manufacturers, LinkedIn ads are the perfect way to do this. Your ideal customers are often buyers or sourcing specialists for a manufacturing company, and they’re professionals who use LinkedIn. Not only is your audience using the platform, their job title and company information is included in their profiles, and LinkedIn uses this information to target ads. You can target ads to people with specific job titles, like “Purchasing Specialist,” “Sourcing Specialist,” etc., as well as by specific company, ensuring that your ads are seen by the people to whom they will be highly relevant, the people you want as customers.

While traditional marketing techniques haven’t always worked for industrial manufacturers, inbound marketing is changing how industrial manufacturers can attract potential customers and edge out their competitors. Click To TweetIf you’re interested in learning more about how inbound marketing can work for your industrial manufacturing enterprise, it’s time to talk with the experts at Evenbound. We have experience marketing in the industrial and B2B space and can increase the ROI of your marketing efforts. Don’t believe us? Check out how we helped one of our industrial clients in this case study.

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Manufacturers: How to Leverage Employee Experts for Quality Content

Manufacturers: How to Leverage Employee Experts for Quality Content

If you’re in a manufacturing enterprise that’s particularly technical in terms of the product or service offerings, you’ll need to get some of your information for content from subject matter experts within your organization. Your company probably has a lot of engineers who are experts at what they do and your company does, and some of their ideas could make for informative manufacturing content that your potential clients will love. But engineers aren’t writers and they have other stuff to do. So here’s how to get that content from them:

Enlist a Technical Writer

Technical writers, the people who write procedures, work instructions, and manuals, have experience both with writing and with technical terminology; it’s part of their skill set to translate technical jargon into words that lay people can understand. Also, they have a lot of experience working with engineers, so they can be helpful in gleaning content from them.

Conduct Interviews

Rather than asking your subject matter expert to write a blog post or white paper or page content for your website, instead, sit down and have a conversation with the expert in question. Ask them for the information you need rather than having them provide you with what they think you need. You might come up with even more questions through the interview process that will be questions that your ideal buyers have, so that you can tailor your content to tell your potential customers what they need and want to know.

Get Source Recommendations

If you don’t understand a particular process or product that your content strategy needs to address, get the experts in your company to tell you where to get the information you need. When they’re in full crisis mode on the plant floor or swamped dealing with a rush order, the people you need info from might not have time to talk to you. But they can point you in the direction of the information you need, saving them time but ensuring you aren’t stalled either.

Use a Review Panel

When you’ve written something without the prior input of a subject matter expert, to glean more information and fill in the gaps in your knowledge and understanding on the subject, get your engineering team or the experts on the topic to look over what you’ve written. They’ll tell you if you got anything wrong and help you add anything you might have missed.

Developing a content strategy for a B2B or industrial business can be a challenge, but it’s one that’s so important to staying on the bleeding edge and remaining competitive in your industry in the digital space. If you’re ready to amp up your content strategy and boost the ROI of your marketing efforts, it’s time that you get in touch with Evenbound.

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Why Lead Response Time is a Critical Factor in Converting B2B Leads

Why Lead Response Time is a Critical Factor in Converting B2B Leads

The B2B world can be incredibly competitive, especially when traditional advertising methods used in the B2C world aren’t effective. But one thing you can do to get a leg up on your competition is to improve your lead response time. Here’s why lead response time is a critical factor in the realm of B2B lead conversion.

What is lead response time?

Lead response time is the amount it takes to respond to a lead after they reach out to your company. In the context of digital marketing, this refers to the time it takes to respond to a lead after they complete an online form. The average lead response time for B2B companies, per Hubspot, was 42 hours, and many companies never responded at all.

Why does lead response time matter?

Lead quality degrades over time. If you don’t respond to your leads, they grow cold and lose interest, either because they’ve moved on to other companies, or they simply move on to their other responsibilities. In fact, the sooner you can respond to your leads, the better.

Why is this? Well, the internet has changed buyer behavior. Customers are doing significant online research about the products and services they’re interested in, all without ever talking to another person. So when potential buyers do reach out, it’s usually when they’re very close to the purchase stage of their buyer’s journey. And that’s the best time to reach them—when they’re interested in and ready to talk to a salesperson.

In addition to when you respond to your leads, how matters too, and how often. Are your reaching out via email or phone? You should probably be doing both. And you shouldn’t give up after one attempt. Doing this helps you to establish a relationship with your lead, nurturing them into a prospect and then a customer.

How do you improve your company’s lead response time?

The first thing you should do is test that response time, and determine how far away your company is from a quick response. Once you’ve done that, you can set in place email automation to send email to leads immediately after they convert by completing a form on your website or landing page. Email automation can also help you follow up with leads at regular intervals to keep your company top of mind.

If you’re ready to improve your lead response time and convert more leads, it’s time to get in touch with Evenbound. We have expertise on the content strategies that will increase visitors, conversions, and leads from your digital content, as well as email marketing and lead segmentation strategies to reduce lead response time and give you the greatest ROI for your digital marketing efforts.

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5 Mistakes You’re Making with Your B2B Blog Content

5 Mistakes You’re Making with Your B2B Blog Content

Digital content writing can be tough. Not only do you have to write well and be engaging and compelling, you have to know what your intended audience (a.k.a. potential customers and leads) is searching for, what they want to know, and how to get them motivated to act on what they’ve learned and get in touch with your people. We see B2Bs missing the mark with their content all the time. Here are the five mistakes you’re probably making with your B2B blog content right now:

1. Too much jargon

You are probably an expert on the products or services that your company provides; you probably know all the industry terminology and abbreviations, too, and use them in your daily conversation. But your customers, especially the kind you’re trying to reach—new customers—probably don’t know the industry jargon. Using too much jargon without properly defining it will confuse your readers and potentially cause them to navigate away from your blog to more understandable and accessible content available elsewhere.

2. Missing content for stages of the buyer’s journey

Customers go through a buyer’s journey when making purchase decisions: the awareness stage, where they become aware of their need for a product or service; the consideration stage, where they consider various suppliers/service providers, price points, product/service offerings, etc.; and the decision stage, where they make a purchase. If you don’t have content geared toward leads in each stage of the buyer’s journey, you’ll miss opportunities to reach leads in certain stages, resulting in lost customers.

3. Missing content for some buyer personas

You might have content that is geared toward buyers of your product, but do you have content geared toward all the potential leads who may have interest in your product? Even if the majority of your business comes from one specific market segment, chances are that you have secondary and tertiary audiences for whom your product or service has value as well. If you’re not reaching out to those audiences as well, you’re missing out on conversion opportunities, as well as the opportunity to diversify your customer base to mitigate dependence on volatile industries.

4. No calls to action

You’re writing blog content because you want your reader to do something. In general, that something is to purchase from your company, but each blog post has its own specific and content-related goal. If you have a blog post on “How to find the right supplier of X component,” it should at some point direct readers to learn more about how your company is the right supplier of that component. For content geared toward prospects in the decision stage of the buyer’s journey, calls to action should direct them to request a quote or to set up an appointment with a sales contact. This is how you turn your blog readers into actual paying customers.

5. Not making content locally-relevant

For a lot of businesses, even B2Bs, location matters. If your operations are housed in a certain location, and that location is beneficial to your customer base or desired customer base, you should incorporate that into your content. For example, if you’re a Tier I or Tier II automotive supplier and you’re located in Michigan, that’s something you should absolutely be using to your advantage, as the Big Three are headquartered in Michigan and many of their warehousing and manufacturing facilities are in Michigan and surrounding Midwestern, Rust Belt states.

If you’re ready to enhance your digital presence and step up your contact game, it’s time to get in touch. Evenbound has expertise on the content strategies that will increase visitors, conversions, and leads from your digital content and boost your digital marketing ROI. Don’t believe us? Check out the case study below:

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How to Write Compelling Service Pages for your Law Practice’s Website

How to Write Compelling Service Pages for your Law Practice’s Website

For your clients, the legal field is a vast and confusing place. After all, there are some lawyers who deal with personal injuries, some with workers’ compensation, some with estate law, some with property disputes, and others with criminal cases—and you know we haven’t even touched on every type of law or lawyer in that list. That’s why service pages are so critical a component of a law practice’s website, because they help your potential clients understand what it is that you do and how you can help them. Here’s how to write services that will be compelling to site visitors and help convert them into clients.

What are the elements of an effective service page?

A service page needs to do four things: define the service, show the value of the service, explain your process for providing that service, and explain why your firm is the right one to provide the service. So, if one practice area of your firm is medical malpractice, your should have a service page defining medical malpractice, explaining how claimants can receive compensation for their injuries if they win or settle the case, how the process of starting a case works, and why they should choose you to represent them.

Why is defining the service important?

Yes, legal services are complex and not easy to boil down into accessible, easily understandable information on a standard website page of approximately 300 to 500 words. But your site visitors are looking for information about whether or not they even have a case and should get in touch with a lawyer. You need to define what medical malpractice is or what workers’ compensation is, otherwise, you’ll only reach people who already know about those things, and that they have a claim—and you’ll miss out on a ton of possible clients.

Why your firm and not the other guys?

Potential clients aren’t just looking at you, they’re looking at other law firms too and comparing them. That’s why your service page should highlight why your firm is the best choice. Maybe it’s your winning record or the amount of money you’ve won for your clients. Maybe it’s a special service you offer, like having attorneys that speak both English and Spanish if you practice in a predominantly Spanish-speaking area of the country or in immigration law. Think about what your audience, your desired clients, are looking for in an attorney and highlight those qualities on your service pages.

If it’s time to rewrite your service pages (or write some for the first time), get in touch with Evenbound. We’ve worked with law firms to create service pages for all areas of their practice that convert site visitors into clients.

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