Manufacturers: How to Leverage Employee Experts for Quality Content

Manufacturers: How to Leverage Employee Experts for Quality Content

If you’re in a manufacturing enterprise that’s particularly technical in terms of the product or service offerings, you’ll need to get some of your information for content from subject matter experts within your organization. Your company probably has a lot of engineers who are experts at what they do and your company does, and some of their ideas could make for informative manufacturing content that your potential clients will love. But engineers aren’t writers and they have other stuff to do. So here’s how to get that content from them:

Enlist a Technical Writer

Technical writers, the people who write procedures, work instructions, and manuals, have experience both with writing and with technical terminology; it’s part of their skill set to translate technical jargon into words that lay people can understand. Also, they have a lot of experience working with engineers, so they can be helpful in gleaning content from them.

Conduct Interviews

Rather than asking your subject matter expert to write a blog post or white paper or page content for your website, instead, sit down and have a conversation with the expert in question. Ask them for the information you need rather than having them provide you with what they think you need. You might come up with even more questions through the interview process that will be questions that your ideal buyers have, so that you can tailor your content to tell your potential customers what they need and want to know.

Get Source Recommendations

If you don’t understand a particular process or product that your content strategy needs to address, get the experts in your company to tell you where to get the information you need. When they’re in full crisis mode on the plant floor or swamped dealing with a rush order, the people you need info from might not have time to talk to you. But they can point you in the direction of the information you need, saving them time but ensuring you aren’t stalled either.

Use a Review Panel

When you’ve written something without the prior input of a subject matter expert, to glean more information and fill in the gaps in your knowledge and understanding on the subject, get your engineering team or the experts on the topic to look over what you’ve written. They’ll tell you if you got anything wrong and help you add anything you might have missed.

Developing a content strategy for a B2B or industrial business can be a challenge, but it’s one that’s so important to staying on the bleeding edge and remaining competitive in your industry in the digital space. If you’re ready to amp up your content strategy and boost the ROI of your marketing efforts, it’s time that you get in touch with Evenbound.

New call-to-action

Email Marketing for Real Estate Developers

Email Marketing for Real Estate Developers

An effective email marketing strategy is very important for home developers looking to sell lots and fill developments quickly. Email marketing functions for developers in two ways: 1) you can let consumers know about your development before you even break ground, making the selling process much smoother for you, and 2) it allows you to hold on to consumers who may not have been ready to purchase a home in one development, but who may be perfect buyers for the next.

When done properly, email marketing has wonderful potential to get your company in front of the right consumers, at the right time. It’s a wonderful addition to any inbound or outbound marketing strategy because it speaks directly to your target buyer. Here are a few key things to know about starting an email marketing campaign for your real estate development company:

Know Who Your Ideal Buyer Is

The first and best way to email your subscriber list effectively is to know who they are. It sounds basic, but you’d be surprised at the number of weird spammy emails the average consumer gets in a day. Know a little something about who you plan on sending that newsletter to, and you’ll see better results all around.

  1. Create buyer personas. For most real estate developments, buyer personas are actually pretty easy to pin down. You already know most of the information: the average income of your typical buyer, the average age, marital status, etc. Pool all of that information into two or three buyer personas, and then segment your email lists accordingly. That way you’re always sending out relevant content to the right buyer persona. That will help keep your number of “unsubscribes” low.
  2. Remember that you can’t make everyone happy. When you start sending newsletters out to a list of email addresses, you’re bound to get a few “unsubscribes”, and that’s okay. Not everyone is a perfect fit for your real estate development, and your goal should be to keep the ones who are a perfect fit on your email list. If you’re selling a real estate development for empty nesters, you shouldn’t be upset about a 20-30 year old unsubscribing. They weren’t a good fit anyway. Instead, focus on creating emails that speak directly to those empty nesters your community is built for.

Speak Solutions, Not Services

Email marketing campaigns that get ignored often have almost nothing to do with the buyer. If you’re just talking about how wonderful your development is, most consumers are going to hit the delete button before they even make it through the headline.

Successful email marketing campaigns are ones that consumers actually want to read, and choose to stay subscribed to.

Yes, you build wonderful homes, and your developments are gorgeous and highly exclusive, but think of that from your buyer’s perspective. Why would they want to move into your development? What problems do they have that your developments solve? Do you offer maintenance-free living? A community center? Close proximity to a golf course, lake, etc?

Instead of talking about your development directly, think about the problems your development solves for the people who live in it. Put those solutions in your email campaigns, and you’ll start to see better subscription and bounce rates.

Though your email marketing campaigns are meant to convert people to make a purchase, you have to talk about something more than the homes you have for sale if you want to convince people. Your homes might be beautiful, but so are a lot of others — what makes your development or community stand out for the residents? How do your homes improve their quality of life?

Keep it Low-Key

Don’t email too much, and don’t email too often. Keep emails short, sweet, and helpful. Play your email campaign casual. It’s no surprise that the decision time for purchasing a new home is long, and for most consumers, no manner of persuasion will get them to buy a new house before they actually have the money to do it. Instead, keep yourself on their radar by continuously providing helpful content that they actually care about, in a way that’s not pushy.

Definitely keep your CTA at the end of every email and newsletter you send out, but try not to send out more than one email a week to regular subscribers. If you’re following up on a lead, that might warrant a few extra emails a week, but if they decide they’re not ready to buy, don’t continue to harass them.

Instead, add them to your regular newsletter, where they will occasionally receive delightful content about choosing the right home, decorating a new home, or knowing when it’s time to purchase a new home. When they do decide to buy a home, you’ll be the first person they call, because your name will be fresh in their minds from your consistent, but casual, emails — emails they genuinely liked!

In the end, an effective email campaign is all about being pleasantly persistent, but not pushy. Keep offering up content that your buyers genuinely want to hear, and they’ll know that you’re truly there to help them — rather than just sell them something.

If you like the idea of email marketing for your development or development company, let’s talk! We’re experienced real estate marketers who understand how marketing a development is different from marketing a home building company. Check out the case study below to see how we generated $9.5M in sales revenue for one developer in just 24 months.

New Call-to-action

6 Key Qualities To Look for In the Perfect CRM

6 Key Qualities To Look for In the Perfect CRM

Whether you’re unhappy with your current CRM, or you’re looking to align your sales and marketing teams with a new one, a quality CRM can be hard to find. We’re here to help.

Traditionally, a CRM, or customer relationship management software has been used to help sales teams track and manage leads through the buyers funnel. Any good CRM that you choose today will do that, along with a whole host of additional services. It’s those extra services that make the difference here. CRMs have been around for so long that tracking, for the most part, is the least of your worries. A new, quality CRM will streamline your sales and marketing handoff, shorten the closing process, and ultimately boost your ROI. If that’s the success you want, here are 6 key qualities to  look for when you’re CRM shopping, to ensure you choose an option that’s perfect for you:

Here are 6 key qualities to look for while you’re CRM shopping, to ensure you choose an option that’s perfect for you:

#1 Easy to Use, Easy to Access

Above all else, a quality CRM should be user-friendly, and accessible from just about anywhere. Today’s sales and marketing teams are on the move — many of them are remote and those that do have an office often work from home or out on the road. They still need to know where their leads are at in the buyers cycle, even when they’re not in the office. A quality CRM will give them that access wherever they log in. Many of today’s top CRMs are cloud-based, and that’s a quality option you simply can’t pass up.

Beyond accessibility, any CRM that’s worth purchasing should be easy to use. If your sales team finds it a hassle to log a lead, they’re less likely to enter them in, which means a greater chance that they’ll forget about them. Choose a CRM that’s interface makes sense and is simple. It might sound ancillary, but even little things like drag and drop features and push notifications can make a big difference to the efficiency of your employees’ use of your CRM. The easier it is, the more likely they are to use it, and the more they use the platform, the easier it is to track your results for effective sales.

#2 Integrates Sales and Marketing

We don’t want to hate on any particular CRM, but Salesforce is a platform of the past. Your sales team simply cannot exist in a bubble if you want to boost ROI and turn a real profit. You need a CRM that works across departments, easily transferring marketing leads over to your sales team, and kicking leads who aren’t quite ready to purchase back to the marketing team. A quality CRM will also help keep both teams informed, ensuring you have that closed-loop reporting that will guarantee a successful collaboration between both teams.

There are CRMs that offer sales features, and easily partner or link up to marketing CRMs, but if you’re just starting out, you’ll want to get a CRM that offers both simultaneously. With features for both teams already implemented in the software, you can easily get your sales & marketing teams up and running, reporting their potential leads and transferring them to the appropriate contacts at the right time, without getting lost in translation.

#3 Real-Time, Big Picture Reporting

The best CRM will let you know how your team is doing with accurate, global reporting. After all, you can’t improve if you don’t know what you’re doing wrong. Choose a CRM that gives you an in-depth look at the results of your sales and marketing team’s efforts. For example, if your marketing team puts out a landing page for your website, your CRM should be able to tell you exactly how that page is performing, but it should also show you how it’s performing in the big picture. Is it up or down compared to other landing pages, and how is it converting? Big picture reporting ensures you know the answers to all of these questions, so you can improve in real-time.

#4 Automation

Your team’s time is money. They’re busy reaching out to new leads and closing deals, and they don’t have time to do all of the little things that can make a big impact. For those little things, like follow-up emails and sending out new, relevant content offers, you want a CRM with automation capabilities. Automated workflows help your sales team qualify more leads in less time, and they help you serve potential clients the content they want, without taking extra time out of your team’s day. Choose a CRM with automation, so your team can work smarter, not harder.

#5 Lead Filtering Options

When you’re utilizing a full suite of inbound marketing tools, your team won’t have time to mess around with unqualified leads. Many quality CRMs offer filtering options so you don’t even see the visitors to your site who won’t ever purchase what you’re selling. From competitors checking out your site to bots to free email accounts, there will be plenty of people browsing your site with no intention to buy. Have your CRM weed them out for you. There are CRM options out there that will immediately disqualify those site visitors for you, so your sales and marketing teams don’t have to give them another thought.

Beyond eliminating unqualified leads, a smart, effective CRM can help you select the best-qualified leads, and ensure they move swiftly through the buyer’s funnel by alerting your sales team of their potential. You can select the options that make a quality lead a quality lead, and your CRM can take it from there.

#6 Notifications

If you’re investing in a CRM, you should be working hard to align your sales and marketing teams for the best possible lead conversion rate. When your marketing team hands off a lead to the sales team, you want the appropriate people to know. It may sound small, but notifications ensure your sales team doesn’t miss out on those hot leads who the marketing team has already nurtured through the majority of the buyers funnel.

When it comes to choosing the perfect CRM, it never hurts to be thorough. While those 6 qualities we pointed out are a great place to start, you’ll probably have more questions and concerns specific to your company. If you’re just not sure what to look for, let’s talk. As a Hubspot Certified Partner, we know what a good CRM looks like, and we can help you work to align your sales and marketing teams with the best on the market.

New call-to-action

Why Lead Response Time is a Critical Factor in Converting B2B Leads

Why Lead Response Time is a Critical Factor in Converting B2B Leads

The B2B world can be incredibly competitive, especially when traditional advertising methods used in the B2C world aren’t effective. But one thing you can do to get a leg up on your competition is to improve your lead response time. Here’s why lead response time is a critical factor in the realm of B2B lead conversion.

What is lead response time?

Lead response time is the amount it takes to respond to a lead after they reach out to your company. In the context of digital marketing, this refers to the time it takes to respond to a lead after they complete an online form. The average lead response time for B2B companies, per Hubspot, was 42 hours, and many companies never responded at all.

Why does lead response time matter?

Lead quality degrades over time. If you don’t respond to your leads, they grow cold and lose interest, either because they’ve moved on to other companies, or they simply move on to their other responsibilities. In fact, the sooner you can respond to your leads, the better.

Why is this? Well, the internet has changed buyer behavior. Customers are doing significant online research about the products and services they’re interested in, all without ever talking to another person. So when potential buyers do reach out, it’s usually when they’re very close to the purchase stage of their buyer’s journey. And that’s the best time to reach them—when they’re interested in and ready to talk to a salesperson.

In addition to when you respond to your leads, how matters too, and how often. Are your reaching out via email or phone? You should probably be doing both. And you shouldn’t give up after one attempt. Doing this helps you to establish a relationship with your lead, nurturing them into a prospect and then a customer.

How do you improve your company’s lead response time?

The first thing you should do is test that response time, and determine how far away your company is from a quick response. Once you’ve done that, you can set in place email automation to send email to leads immediately after they convert by completing a form on your website or landing page. Email automation can also help you follow up with leads at regular intervals to keep your company top of mind.

If you’re ready to improve your lead response time and convert more leads, it’s time to get in touch with Evenbound. We have expertise on the content strategies that will increase visitors, conversions, and leads from your digital content, as well as email marketing and lead segmentation strategies to reduce lead response time and give you the greatest ROI for your digital marketing efforts.

angstrom-cta
5 Mistakes You’re Making with Your B2B Blog Content

5 Mistakes You’re Making with Your B2B Blog Content

Digital content writing can be tough. Not only do you have to write well and be engaging and compelling, you have to know what your intended audience (a.k.a. potential customers and leads) is searching for, what they want to know, and how to get them motivated to act on what they’ve learned and get in touch with your people. We see B2Bs missing the mark with their content all the time. Here are the five mistakes you’re probably making with your B2B blog content right now:

1. Too much jargon

You are probably an expert on the products or services that your company provides; you probably know all the industry terminology and abbreviations, too, and use them in your daily conversation. But your customers, especially the kind you’re trying to reach—new customers—probably don’t know the industry jargon. Using too much jargon without properly defining it will confuse your readers and potentially cause them to navigate away from your blog to more understandable and accessible content available elsewhere.

2. Missing content for stages of the buyer’s journey

Customers go through a buyer’s journey when making purchase decisions: the awareness stage, where they become aware of their need for a product or service; the consideration stage, where they consider various suppliers/service providers, price points, product/service offerings, etc.; and the decision stage, where they make a purchase. If you don’t have content geared toward leads in each stage of the buyer’s journey, you’ll miss opportunities to reach leads in certain stages, resulting in lost customers.

3. Missing content for some buyer personas

You might have content that is geared toward buyers of your product, but do you have content geared toward all the potential leads who may have interest in your product? Even if the majority of your business comes from one specific market segment, chances are that you have secondary and tertiary audiences for whom your product or service has value as well. If you’re not reaching out to those audiences as well, you’re missing out on conversion opportunities, as well as the opportunity to diversify your customer base to mitigate dependence on volatile industries.

4. No calls to action

You’re writing blog content because you want your reader to do something. In general, that something is to purchase from your company, but each blog post has its own specific and content-related goal. If you have a blog post on “How to find the right supplier of X component,” it should at some point direct readers to learn more about how your company is the right supplier of that component. For content geared toward prospects in the decision stage of the buyer’s journey, calls to action should direct them to request a quote or to set up an appointment with a sales contact. This is how you turn your blog readers into actual paying customers.

5. Not making content locally-relevant

For a lot of businesses, even B2Bs, location matters. If your operations are housed in a certain location, and that location is beneficial to your customer base or desired customer base, you should incorporate that into your content. For example, if you’re a Tier I or Tier II automotive supplier and you’re located in Michigan, that’s something you should absolutely be using to your advantage, as the Big Three are headquartered in Michigan and many of their warehousing and manufacturing facilities are in Michigan and surrounding Midwestern, Rust Belt states.

If you’re ready to enhance your digital presence and step up your contact game, it’s time to get in touch. Evenbound has expertise on the content strategies that will increase visitors, conversions, and leads from your digital content and boost your digital marketing ROI. Don’t believe us? Check out the case study below:

New call-to-action


How to Write Compelling Service Pages for your Law Practice’s Website

How to Write Compelling Service Pages for your Law Practice’s Website

For your clients, the legal field is a vast and confusing place. After all, there are some lawyers who deal with personal injuries, some with workers’ compensation, some with estate law, some with property disputes, and others with criminal cases—and you know we haven’t even touched on every type of law or lawyer in that list. That’s why service pages are so critical a component of a law practice’s website, because they help your potential clients understand what it is that you do and how you can help them. Here’s how to write services that will be compelling to site visitors and help convert them into clients.

What are the elements of an effective service page?

A service page needs to do four things: define the service, show the value of the service, explain your process for providing that service, and explain why your firm is the right one to provide the service. So, if one practice area of your firm is medical malpractice, your should have a service page defining medical malpractice, explaining how claimants can receive compensation for their injuries if they win or settle the case, how the process of starting a case works, and why they should choose you to represent them.

Why is defining the service important?

Yes, legal services are complex and not easy to boil down into accessible, easily understandable information on a standard website page of approximately 300 to 500 words. But your site visitors are looking for information about whether or not they even have a case and should get in touch with a lawyer. You need to define what medical malpractice is or what workers’ compensation is, otherwise, you’ll only reach people who already know about those things, and that they have a claim—and you’ll miss out on a ton of possible clients.

Why your firm and not the other guys?

Potential clients aren’t just looking at you, they’re looking at other law firms too and comparing them. That’s why your service page should highlight why your firm is the best choice. Maybe it’s your winning record or the amount of money you’ve won for your clients. Maybe it’s a special service you offer, like having attorneys that speak both English and Spanish if you practice in a predominantly Spanish-speaking area of the country or in immigration law. Think about what your audience, your desired clients, are looking for in an attorney and highlight those qualities on your service pages.

If it’s time to rewrite your service pages (or write some for the first time), get in touch with Evenbound. We’ve worked with law firms to create service pages for all areas of their practice that convert site visitors into clients.

New call-to-action